Transcript
Item Title: The Rhodesian Dilemma
Guest: Muzorewa, Abel Tendekayi, 1925-
Host: Buckley, William F., Jr., 1925-2008
Date Created: July 21, 1978
Description: "Bishop Muzorewa," as WFB introduces him, "has been ... the outstanding leader

in Rhodesia, demanding political rights for the black majority.

He eschewed violence, insisting on other forms of pressure.

...
Description: "Bishop Muzorewa," as WFB introduces him, "has been ... the outstanding leader

in Rhodesia, demanding political rights for the black majority. He eschewed violence, insisting on other forms of pressure. He pursued Christian principles." But in Western establishment opinion he had fallen from grace by joining (with two other black leaders) in a Provisional Council with Prime Minister Ian Smith, to shepherd Rhodesia through what they hoped would be a peaceful transition. Revolutionaries led by Joshua Nkomo and Robert Mugabe were waging guerrilla warfare, "with the explicit goal," as WFB puts it, "of frustrating the national plebiscite and creating an all-black Marxist-oriented state." So why aren't Americans rallying behind the moderates? Bishop Muzorewa gives us a richly detailed account of postwar African political history, including the terms on which,

say, Tanganyika and Zambia got their independence, and how that affects their attitudes towards present-day Rhodesia: "Your State Department... I believe is acting ... to appease certain powers in Africa ... [who] have one person they have decided should be the king of Zimbabwe and they are trying to be kingmakers themselves. This started with Dr. Kaunda [President of Zambia], who is personally committed to Mr. Nkomo, and he has mobilized every front-line state, so called, to support him."

Description (cont'd): He pursued Christian principles." But in Western establishment opinion he had fallen from grace by joining (with two other black leaders) in a Provisional Council with Prime Minister Ian Smith, to shepherd Rhodesia through what they hoped would be a peaceful transition. Revolutionaries led by Joshua Nkomo and Robert Mugabe were waging guerrilla warfare, "with the explicit goal," as WFB puts it, "of frustrating the national plebiscite and creating an all-black Marxist-oriented state." So why aren't Americans rallying behind the moderates? Bishop Muzorewa gives us a richly detailed account of postwar African political history, including the terms on which,

say, Tanganyika and Zambia got their independence, and how that affects their attitudes towards present-day Rhodesia: "Your State Department... I believe is acting ... to appease certain powers in Africa ... [who] have one person they have decided should be the king of Zimbabwe and they are trying to be kingmakers themselves. This started with Dr. Kaunda [President of Zambia], who is personally committed to Mr. Nkomo, and he has mobilized every front-line state, so called, to support him."
Theme(s): Diplomacy , Radio & Television
Subject(s): Zimbabwe ; Politics and government ; United States ; Africa ; Foreign relations
Language(s): English
Country of Origin: United States
Place Recorded: New York City, New York, United States
Dimensions: Duration: 60 minutes
Format: Moving Image, Text
Medium: television programs
Aspect Ratio:
4:3
4:3
Color:
color
color
Soundtrack:
sound
sound
Hoover ID: Program S0331
Record Number: 80040.578
Notes: Video available through Amazon.
Rights: Copyright held by Stanford University. This copy is provided for educational and research purposes only. No publication, further reproduction, or reuse of copies, beyond fair use, may be made without the express written permission of the Hoover Institution Library & Archives on behalf of Stanford University.
Collection Structure: Firing Line broadcast records > Audiovisual file > The Rhodesian Dilemma
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