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Item Title: The Irish Problem
Guest: O'Neill, Terence, 1914-1990
Guest: Donoghue, Denis
Host: Buckley, William F., Jr., 1925-2008
Date Created: July 22, 1969
Description: Firing Line's first look at "the Irish Question"-still very much a question fifty years after the country had been partitioned.

WFB begins by saying that Captain O'Neill had resigned "in protest against his own party's failure to back him up with sufficient conviction ... in his determination more or less moderately to provide for the rights of Catholics."

...
Description: Firing Line's first look at "the Irish Question"-still very much a question fifty years after the country had been partitioned. WFB begins by saying that Captain O'Neill had resigned "in protest against his own party's failure to back him up with sufficient conviction ... in his determination more or less moderately to provide for the rights of Catholics." Captain O'Neill begins with a partial correction: "I felt that if I were to resign at the time I did that my policies might continue under somebody else, and ... in fact the reform has indeed, though I say it myself, gathered pace since I resigned." A genuine conversation, rich in anecdote, in which our guests-both born and raised in Northern Ireland, the one Protestant, the other Catholic-work to help an American audience understand this tangled situation. DD: "Growing up in Northern Ireland, which I did, the terminology which surrounded me ... in fact was a sectarian and religious terminology. You know, in the sense that I could spot a Protestant at a hundred yards, and, even more radically, he could spot me." WFB: "You being a Catholic?" DD: "I was a Catholic and am ... It was a sectarian division, it was really not a political division. Certainly, it's true I believe even yet in Northern Ireland, that one is not primarily aware of people as being Nationalists and Unionists, in a political context, but rather of their being Catholics or Protestants, in a sectarian context."

Description (cont'd): Captain O'Neill begins with a partial correction: "I felt that if I were to resign at the time I did that my policies might continue under somebody else, and ... in fact the reform has indeed, though I say it myself, gathered pace since I resigned." A genuine conversation, rich in anecdote, in which our guests-both born and raised in Northern Ireland, the one Protestant, the other Catholic-work to help an American audience understand this tangled situation. DD: "Growing up in Northern Ireland, which I did, the terminology which surrounded me ... in fact was a sectarian and religious terminology. You know, in the sense that I could spot a Protestant at a hundred yards, and, even more radically, he could spot me." WFB: "You being a Catholic?" DD: "I was a Catholic and am ... It was a sectarian division, it was really not a political division. Certainly, it's true I believe even yet in Northern Ireland, that one is not primarily aware of people as being Nationalists and Unionists, in a political context, but rather of their being Catholics or Protestants, in a sectarian context."
Theme(s): Radio & Television
Subject(s): Northern Ireland ; Politics and government
Language(s): English
Country of Origin: United Kingdom
Place Recorded: London, England, United Kingdom
Dimensions: Duration: 50 minutes
Format: Text
Medium: television programs
Aspect Ratio:
4:3
4:3
Color:
color
color
Soundtrack:
sound
sound
Hoover ID: Program 159
Record Number: 80040.159
Notes: Video available through special order.
Rights: Copyright held by Stanford University. This copy is provided for educational and research purposes only. No publication, further reproduction, or reuse of copies, beyond fair use, may be made without the express written permission of the Hoover Institution Library & Archives on behalf of Stanford University.
Collection Structure: Firing Line broadcast records > Audiovisual file > The Irish Problem

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